COMMENTARY

Mitigate the Impacts When Communities and Nature Collide

Natural hazards introduce potential dangers when naturally occurring environmental factors impact communities and the built environment. Wildfires, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, public health threats, blizzards, ice storms, tornados, volcanos, and hail are just a few examples of hazards that can have devastating effects when they occur in populated areas. Emergency preparedness professionals plan for and try to mitigate such events, but nature is not always predictable. For example, La Niña and El Niño events do not…

Most Recent

Preparing for the Next Public Health Emergency

Public health is not just about pandemics but also about a wide range of threats that can affect the health and well-being of communities. In this April edition of the Domestic Preparedness Journal, practitioners share ways to prepare for the next public health emergency.
silhouette of three women on mountain cliff with sun setting in background

An Editor’s Personal Journey to Emergency Preparedness

In honor of Women’s History Month, the March edition of the Domestic Preparedness Journal features articles by inspirational women who, through their service and writing, are instrumental in building more prepared and resilient communities. The editor also shares her personal journey into emergency preparedness.

Nation-State Threats – Preparing at All Levels

The February 2024 edition of the Domestic Preparedness Journal builds awareness of some of the nation’s threats and vulnerabilities. Discover protective measures and approaches for combating nation-state threats and strengthening homeland security and national resilience.
drawing of blond woman sitting at desk with open laptop, plants on both sides

New Year’s Resolution – Stronger Communities

For many, the first month of each year spurs a renewed energy for change and setting higher goals. This January, what New Year’s resolution would make your community stronger and more resilient?

Commentary Archives

Building Strength in Workforce and Structure

Each person plays a critical leadership role, from top leadership to frontline workers. The authors in the December edition of the Domestic Preparedness Journal share

Find Chances to Make Positive Changes

Emergency preparedness and response professionals willingly insert themselves into many emergencies and disasters that they could have avoided in other professions. However, they use these

PPD-44: Implications for Domestic Incident Management

An essential national incident management guidance document is finally available to responders nationwide. This document will significantly improve a unified response to and recovery from

We Want to Hear from You!

Interested in sharing your thoughts on ways to improve the Domestic Preparedness Journal? Willing to help by participating in a 60-minute market research interview? We’re

The Role of Faith in Disasters

Many faith-based organizations have disaster response and recovery components as major elements of their own missions. By partnering with governmental and nongovernmental organizations, faith-based groups

Training the Next Generation of Cyber Guardians

Despite small local governments being overrun with malware, ransomware, and myriad other threats, it is difficult to find experienced cybersecurity professionals. Meanwhile, students search for

TWITTER

Follow Us

Get Instant Access

Subscribe today to Domestic Preparedness and get real-world insights for safer communities.

Commentary

Mitigate the Impacts When Communities and Nature Collide

Natural hazards introduce potential dangers when naturally occurring environmental factors impact communities and the built environment. Wildfires, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, public health threats, blizzards, ice storms, tornados, volcanos, and hail are just a few examples of hazards that can have devastating effects when they occur in populated areas. Emergency preparedness professionals plan for and try to mitigate such events, but nature is not always predictable. For example, La Niña and El Niño events do not…

Most Recent

Commentary Archives

You’re the Leader. Now What?

  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that, as of May 8, the United States had experienced seven confirmed $1-billion weather/climate-related disasters in

Planning for Future Events Requires Updated Plans

Threats, hazards, and risks change over time as numerous variables change. This means preparedness professionals must be forward-thinking when planning for emergencies and disasters. Past

Technological Strategies for Organizational Leadership

Article Out Loud Integrating information technology (IT) into emergency management and public safety agencies involves balancing technological limitations with the organizational mindset. Finding this balance

TWITTER

Follow Us

Get Instant Access

Subscribe today to Domestic Preparedness and get real-world insights for safer communities.

Translate »